Yamaha Outboard 100 Hour Service | Yamaha F50 100 Hour Service | Boats.net


Hey guys, Adam Hess here with Boats.net.
Today we’re gonna be working on our Yamaha F50 TLR. We’re gonna be doing a
simple 100 hour service which is going to include changing the engine oil, oil
filter, gearcase lube, and the fuel filter. So let’s grab the tools and get
started. Okay today’s job is gonna be a skill level one. It doesn’t require a lot
of knowledge or a lot of specialty tools. We have a standard 3/8 ratchet, a pair of
adjustable pliers, a large, flat-head screwdriver, an open end wrench that fits
our flathead screwdriver, a pair of side cuts, a 14 millimeter, 17 millimeter,
six-point socket, a small 3/8 extension, an impact driver, a piece of one inch
hose, a grease gun, a specialty filter wrench, our standard filter wrench, a
piece of hose with a barb fitting on it, and we also have a pump here to pump our
gear case lube out. Now that we got our tools together head over to Boats.net,
take a look at the diagrams and let’s get the parts together so we can get this
job started. A lot of people think changing the oil is a tedious task. It’s
really not. There’s a couple different ways we could do this, but today we are
going to demonstrate showing you how to drain the oil out of the drain plug
because we do have our boat on a trailer here. So, we will grab our 14 millimeter
socket and we’re going to trim the motor up. By trimming the motor up what this
does is allow the oil to get in the back of the oil pan and it’ll allow us to
pull this drain plug out without oil going everywhere. Now there’s two
different ways we could do this from the oil plug. You can take a piece of hose
and put it over this rubber boot which will allow us to direct the oil in the
oil pan. However we’re going to show you the hose barb trick here. I’m going to go
ahead and thread this in and as we trim it down our oil should
drain into our pan. It’s just as simple as that. Okay now that our oils finished
draining into our bucket here, we’re going to go ahead and we’re going to
trim our motor back up so we can remove our tube. And now we’re gonna get our
little crush washer here so we can replace it on our drain plug and it is
part of the oil change kit we are using the Yamaha service kit which includes
the oil filter, three quarts of oil, and the little crush washer. We’ll go ahead
and we’ll put this back in here and get it tightened up. And we’ll go ahead and
trim this back down one more time so we could get to our oil filter. Now on the
oil filter you can use a filter wrench, Yamaha also has a specialty tool that
slides right on the end of it and we’ll go ahead and loosen the filter. And I’m
gonna go ahead and lay a rag in here just in case we drip a little bit to
keep everything all nice and clean. And there we have it our filters out. Okay
let’s go ahead and grab our new filter here. Go ahead and pull our plastic off.
There’s already grease on it so we don’t have to worry about putting any oil or
anything on it. We’ll hand tighten it. Go ahead and put
our wrench back on it and all we want to do is snug it down. Next thing we need to
do is we need to add oil to the motor. This motor takes two point two two quarts
of oil. Go ahead and remove the cap. We have our funnel here and we’ll go ahead
and put the oil in it. Now that we have two quarts in there we’ll go ahead and
we’ll pull the dipstick and check our oil dipstick and see how much oil we
have in there. Yeah, that looks like we’re almost at 1/2 so we’re gonna go ahead
and add a little bit more oil. We want to be sure not to overfill it. Looks like we’re almost full so we’re
gonna go ahead and leave it there until we crank it up when we get done with
their service and then we’ll double check it again and add any more that we
need to. And changing the oil is as simple as that. So we’re going to move on
to step two of our hundred hour service now, and we’re gonna change the gearcase
lube. We’re going to go ahead and we are going to take our drain plug out. Use a
large flat-head screwdriver. A lot of larger screwdrivers do have a piece here
that we could put a open end wrench on to help assist us and we will put it on
here like this. And we will take the bottom out first which is the actual
drain. We want to be sure to have an oil pan underneath the motor because a
little bits going to come out. And when we pull this out here this is an actual
magnet so we want to check this for any metal. We want to go ahead and wipe the
metal shavings off of this. And one thing that we’re paying attention to here is
to see if there is any milky color in the oil. That would be an in an
indication that we have a seal out, there’s water getting in the gearcase
lube or something like that. And now we’re gonna go ahead and open our top
vent and it’s gonna allow our gearcase lube to start coming out. And we’ll go
ahead and trim this down. We want it all the way down and sure we get all the
gearcase lube out. Now if you have difficulty pulling out the the drain
depending on how old your outboard is or how tight those are in there, you may
need to use the impact hammer. This will help prevent you from stripping that
head out on that bolt. While that thing’s draining here we’re gonna go ahead and
grab our gear case lube and we also have a pump for it that’s going to allow us
to fill this lower unit back up. And we’re gonna go ahead and replace the
little washers that are on both the drain and the fill. On the end of our
quart pump this little adapter piece here which will allow us to thread the
nipple into the gear case. Now we’re gonna fill this gear case from the
bottom up. The reason why we do that is filling it by the bottom it’s going to
allow us to push all the air out of the top starting to come out a little bit
see the air bubbles coming out so we’re gonna go ahead and fill it up until all
the bubbles are done pushing out. Just like that,
be sure to have your pan underneath. We’re gonna go ahead and put
her bench screw back in this. Give it a good little snug for extra reassurance.
And wipe off any excessive oil on it. Now to make it easier, after you’ve filled it
up like this you can go ahead and trim the motor back up. We’ll have a rag ready. And as you can
see because we have our vent filled back up our gear lube is not running out so
we can go ahead and unscrew this and go ahead and put our drain plug in. And
we’ll just snug it up once again for a little reassurance. And now we’ve
completed changing our gear case lube and we will move on to changing our fuel
filter. Thread this off and we’ll go ahead and pull this out. We’ll go ahead
and cut these tie wraps so we can pull the filter off and unplug it. Dump the
fuel out. Looks nice and clean. No water, no debris. Get our new fuel filter and
we’ll go ahead and put it right back up in there. Tighten it up as far as you can
by hand and we will plug our sensor back in. Okay we’re gonna go ahead and pump up
our primer bulb here. Watch the fuel fill up and we have no leak so we’re good to
go. Now this particular boat has a fuel
water separator in it so we’re gonna go ahead and change that as well. Go ahead
and we’ll take our filter off. Sometimes it can be a little bit difficult
depending on how long that filter’s been on there. And we’re gonna take this
filter and we’re gonna do the same thing. We’re gonna go ahead and dump it out. See if
there’s any water, any particles, anything give us a good idea if we have water in
our fuel. And we have our new filter here. Some people go ahead and put the filter
on, however sometimes they can’t catch a prime. It’s difficult to prime it up with
the primer bulb so we’re gonna go ahead and put a little fuel from a fuel can in
it that’ll give us a good start on getting the primer bulb nice and stiff
again. Yeah our filter’s close to full we’re
going to go ahead and we are gonna put this right back on the housing. We’ll snug
it up with pliers. Just need a nice and snug to seal the o-rings on it. And we’ll
go ahead and prime it the rest of the way with our primer bulb. So the next
thing we’re going to move on to is greasing a couple of the grease fittings
here. And this particular Yamaha has two grease fittings on the tilt tube. You
want to put a little bit of grease in it, just enough and we start seeing it come
out a little bit. There we go, just like that. And the last thing we’re going to
do is we’re going to check our power tilt the trim fluid to make sure that it
is all the way full. So in order to do that we need to trim the motor up one
last time. So we’re gonna grab a 17 millimeter six point socket, gonna go
ahead and just loosen this up. Have a rag handy. And it looks like we are full. Go
ahead and put that back on, tighten it back up,
just snug. Well there you have it. We’ve just completed our 100 our basic service
on our Yamaha at F50 TLR outboard motor. For all the parts you can find us
online at Boats.net and also stay tuned as we get more depth in servicing this
Yamaha outboard motor.

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