WEBINAR: National Employment First Website Launch


>>Hello, everyone. Welcome to the LEAD Center
webinar. This is a national employment first website launch that is being presented collaboratively
by the LEAD Center and the Office of Disability Employment Policy at ODEP, Social Dynamics
and Altarum Institute.nThis is Rebecca Salon. Before we launch into the content I wanted
to turn this over to my colleague Nakia Matthews to give you some housekeeping details so you
can hopefully participate.>>Thank you, Rebecca. The audio for today’s
webinar is being broadcast through your computer. Please make sure that your speakers are turned
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If you do not have sound capabilities on your computer or if you prefer to the scene by
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code. Please note you do not need to enter an attendee ID. Realtime captioning is provided
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at the end of the presentation today for questions. Please use the Q&A box to submit any questions
you have during the webinar or you may use the chat feature to send questions to me,
the host, Nakia Matthews. If you are listening by phone and not logged into the webinar,
you can ask questions by e-mailing them to me at [email protected] Please note that
this webinar is being recorded and that the materials will be placed on the LEAD Center
website at the URL you see below.>>If you experience any technical difficulties
during this webinar, please use the chat box to send me a message, or you may e-mail me
at [email protected] And I’m going to turn it back over to Rebecca.
>>Thank you so much, next year. For those of you who are new to the LEAD Center, we
are the National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of
People with Disabilities. We are a collaborative of disability Workforce and economic empowerment
organizations led by National Disability Institute with funding from the US Department of Labor
Office of Disability Employment Policy. Our mission is to advance sustainable individual
and systems level change that results in improved competitive, integrated employment and economic
self-sufficiency outcomes for people across the spectrum of disabilities. And now I’d
like to turn this over to Serena Lowe.>>I believe Serena may be having some connection
difficulties. Chris Button, are you able to —
>>Hello?>>Chris, I think you are unmuted. I think
Serena is having connection difficulties.>>While we’re waiting for Serena, we are
thrilled to be launching this web portal today. Serena has been working really hard with the
Social Dynamics and Altarum Institute and LEAD contractors and grantees to make this
available to everyone. And we are just really thrilled. We thank those of you who are dialing
in today to listen and find out about useful this web portal is going to be. And I think
he will feel it will be very useful after you see all the incredible data that’s going
to be made available to you. I did get an e-mail from Serena. She is having difficulty
getting in. So let’s go ahead until she joins and keep moving, Rebecca. Thank you.
>>Okay. Thank you, Chris. So today’s presenters are Doug Klayman and Danielle Herbert from
Social Dynamics. And Chris Weaver from Altarum Institute. And with that I think I will turn
it over to Doug, Danielle and Chris to present on this very exciting website launch.
>>Looks like a few hundred people on the phone or on the webinar today.G oing through
this webinar with us and learning more about the employment first website. I’m the President
of Social Dynamics. We’ve been working with Serena for over a year to develop the website
we’re going to show you today. The Employment First website as you know is part of the LEAD
Center website. It’s a component which gives the user not only access to the Employment
First data but also a lot of information on various LEAD Center initiatives and related
Disability Employment Policy issues. The Employment First website was a concept that Serena and
a number of people at ODEP came up with over a year ago. And we worked with her and number
of her colleagues to implement their vision for a system that provides useful information
or — to researchers, policy analysts, practitioners, consumers, family members and students interested
in disability issues. So hopefully as we move forward with the Employment First website,it
will be used by a range of different kinds of stakeholders as we continue to and — to
develop the website. Our partner Altarum Institute, you’ll hear from Chris Weaver in a few minutes,
they designed the website and developed the underlying databases that all of the information
is stored in. Social Dynamics’ role is to collect all the quantitative and policy data
that you’ll see today. And we update that information on a quarterly basis. So we’re
going to take about 40 minutes right now to walk you through the system, and we know that
there are a lot of people with us today. You may have a number of questions as we go through
it. What you should do is submit questions via the webinar system, and we will answer
some of your questions at the conclusion of the presentation. And then over the next few
days we’ll prepare an e-mail for everybody and we’ll send out all of the responses to
your questions. But keep sending the questions in. Give us the information on what you would
like to change about the system or how it could be enhanced to be even more useful to
people. So as we move forward, we’re going to start by going through each screen. Chris
is going to walk us through that. We’ll provide a quick description of each button and how
it works and the various functions of the system. Danielle Herbert, my colleague from
Social Dynamics and I, will discuss data sources, outcomes and policy analysis. So we’ll give
you some background on where everything came from. So let’s go to the system itself. The
first home page that we’re going to show you gives you a national snapshot of the web system
and a national snapshot of all the states that are currently in the system. Do we have
that up?>>Not yet, Doug. This is Chris. For everybody,
I’m going to share my screen now. And it may open in a new window, or it may open in the
webinar window depending on which system your participating from. So give me one second
here and we’ll get that website up for everyone. There we go. So as you heard Doug mentioned,
this is the landing page. This site can be accessed via the URL, Employment First,employmentfirst.leadcenter.org.
We encourage you to go to the site and give us any feedback you might have. The first
thing you may notice if you been to LEAD Center before is the site is cross-branded. It’s
very complementary to LEAD Center. And at any time while you’re on the site, you can
click on the LEAD Center logo and that will take you back to the LEAD Center site. So
they.>>Chris, it’s Rebecca. I don’t think your
screen is being shared. We’re not seeing it.>>Okay. I’m seeing it on the participants
screens as well.>>I see it.
>>Danielle sees it.>>It’s going.
>>Okay. So back to the Employment First site. Just as a side note, the site is fully responsive.
This can be accessed via any device. Obviously it’s easiest to access on a computer with
a full-size monitor, but it is fully accessible and it will adjust to any size screen. Now,
what you’re seeing in front of you is a map, a national map. And then you see some national
snapshot data. This is just the highest level data points that have been entered into this
system. In a very, very small portion of the data that’s here. But I’ll read on the right-hand
side, just the top one and this is2012 number of people with disabilities, all disabilities
aged 16 to 64 and that number is 20,062,920.And that is an aggregate of all the state David
has been entered. This is a dynamic system and as it changes and as data get answers
— entered it automatically gets updated. This will always show the most recent year
of data that has been entered. Currently 2012 is the most recent data available. Very shortly
2013 will be available. For each data point you can also see the percent change from the
previous year, for the most recent two years of data that have be entered into the system.
I won’t read every one of those data points to you because they are right there on your
screen. Now I’m going to go back over to the map. As we scroll over the states, what you’ll
see is those same data points. So you can very quickly at a glance see how each estate
contributes to that national data. We’ll get into some much more comprehensive view of
the data in a moment. But this is just a nice feature to allow you to see those top-level
data points. And if you click on any of these estates it will take you right to that state’s
full profile. So now let’s go up to the main navigation. As you heard me mention, we have
national data and we’ll get to that in a second. We have the state profiles and that is just
the full information available for each state. We have state comparisons. What this allows
us to do is it allows us to do a very targeted data comparison between up to three states,
for any given year for a particular data category. Again I’ll show you that specifically a bit
later on. Then we have advanced search. While the state comparison is to compare the data,
the advanced search allows you to search all of the state actions that have been entered
into the system or the legislation and the other resources. So you can do a very, very
targeted search. Very, very useful feature. You also see on the right-hand side a general
text search. You can do keyword search overall on the site. You see a print this page icon.
And you see a contact us button. I can we’ll show those a little bit later. So now we’re
going to move on to the national data. And I’m going to click on that and the page is
going to take a couple seconds to load because it’s quite a bit of data. And you will see
that minute hopefully here. Again, this national data set is an aggregate of all the state
data that has been entered. I apologize. This is taking a little bit longer to load, but
it’s an aggregate of all the state data that has been entered, and the Social Dynamics
team has done a wonderful job of getting all that data entered in there. So —
>>Let me just interject while we’re going through — having a little glitch here — the
primary sources of data are government agencies. Usually federal agencies with the exception
of I/DD data which we’re getting at the state level. But you’ll see that in some sections,
we used multiple sources of data. We’re going to show you where the data comes from. We
have citations throughout the website, and you’ll be able to actually determine where
each data point comes from. So this is due to the fact that different data points in
each section are pulled from different sites for a did — given topic area. For example
if we go to a national snapshot and look at the Vocational Rehabilitation services, we’ll
show you RSA data that includes GPRA measures and RSA closer status tables. But we’ve also
captured things likeinformation on type of disability for VR customers to make sure information
for both people with I/DD and those with other barriers to employment are represented. So
let’s go back to the national profile, and then we can maneuver ourselves to the state
profile button and look at what we can get drilled down into a specific state. Chris,
can you get us there?>>Yes. Going back to it here. In a second.
Bear with me. Hold on one second here. The site —
I’m sorry, folks. Bear with me one minute
here. The site appears to have just gone down. So give me one minute here.
>>This is Nakia. We finally do have Serena on the line. If you want to take this opportunity
to speak a little bit? We did have Chris speak but if you want to chime in now, that would
be great.>>Sure. While we’re in this period of transition,
going into screen sharing mode, it’s our pleasure at ODEP to be working with such tremendous
federal contractors both at Social Dynamics and at[Indiscernible] as well as our national
LEAD Center team in rolling out what we think is a very important resource for sharing information
to both the public, the disability stakeholders, to state government, and both state and federal
policymakers related to the area of federal Disability Employment Policy and how this
is translating into the states. We are not aware personally at ODE Pof any platform that
is available online today that has the level of robustness and comprehensive databoth in
terms of data points that are reported, across several systems, but also the deep detail
and analysis of what’s going on in each of the states, from a policy standpoint. And
as the nation has seen more and more states adopt Employment First policies and strategies,
it’s important for us to be able to look and see what’s happening in different states and
be able to have an online really — online resource that provides easy and free access
to the public and to anybody who’s interested in determining what’s going on at a state
level, and also learning about different strategies and initiatives and approaches that are being
applied at the states. And we have worked so closely. This is a three-year project in
the making. We work extremely closely with our colleagues at a federal level, with state
government, on what they would find useful about this platform, and also with disability
stakeholders about what they would find useful, and we’re just really delighted to be rolling
this out. I appreciate everyone’s flexibility with us as we’re still working out some kinks.
And you guys are our early adopters. I’m sure Chris and Doug have mentioned this will not
be going live nationally until about a week from now. This is our soft launch. And we
really delighted to be rolling this out and to get your all’s initial feedback and thoughts
about the utility of this platform moving forward. So I’m going to turn it back over
to Chris Weaver now because I see it’s back up and moving. And just really appreciate
about this opportunity, to basically launch our national disability employment awareness
month with a bang, with such a rich and comprehensive policy and data platform. Chris, I will turn
it back to you.>>I apologize, everybody there. I appreciate
your patience. So we’ll pick it back up from the national data page. As you heard me mention
earlier, this is the very robust data set. And this is an aggregate of all the state
data that’s been entered. And this data is organized categorically. By top-level category.
And it’s always going to show by category the most recent three years of data so you
can kind of see the progression. So I’m going to read to you the data categories as we go
down. We’ve got general data, then Bureau of Labor Statistics, SSA outcomes,mental health
outcomes,Wagner-Peyser outcomes, Workforce development outcomes, VR outcomes,I/DD outcomes,
I don’t scroll very evenly, do I? Educational outcomes, AbilityOne and Wage and Hour division
outcomes. ‘S as you can see it’s a very, very comprehensive data set. And each category
has its sources listed. So if you really want to drill into where that data came from, each
one you can click on that, and go straight to it. You can do that with each category
as you see fit. So Doug, did you want to talk a little more about the national data?
>>Yeah. I just wanted to mention that there are something like 75 data points. I don’t
know if Chris mentioned that already. And when we actually pull the data in, there are
actually thousands of data entry fields that were entered. So we get the information from
a number of different sources. We bring it together. And here, one of the most important
things about doing this kind of analysis is that you need to know where your data comes
from in order to use it. So if you’re using this information, you want to reference all
the information that you create if you’re going to do a report based on the system.
So one of the things that we’ve con painstakingly into is to really track the websites that
the information comes from so that people can really do a legitimate descriptive analysis
using the data in the system. Chris?>>Thanks, Doug. And with that, we will go
to the state profiles. And what you see here is just a listing of states. You can get to
the state profile from the map as I mentioned on the home page. Or you can come here and
click on the specific state profiles. And I’ll start with Hawaii as an example. You’re
going to see just a real brief summary. And what this is, is kind of a whimsical way just
to kind of introduce each state before you get to the profile. And the idea here is that
as the states get engaged, this will be a much more comprehensive summary of what’s
going on within that state with respect to Employment First. So I’ll read the Hawaii
one to you. Disability is a respected part of diversity in the rainbow state where employees
with disabilities are saying aloha to new jumper –new job opportunities across the
state. Richard, very well done. We won’t go to Hawaii. Let’s go to Iowa. The model of
the state of Iowa is liberties we prize and rights we will maintain. This includes the
liberties that come with having a job and equal rights to real work for real pay. So
let’s go ahead and go to Iowa’s full profile. This is going to take a few seconds to load.
But it’s a very comprehensive data set and information set for Iowa. What you see when
you first get to the state page is you see that brief summary again. We hope that this
will develop into a much more comprehensive summary of what the states are doing as the
states get more engaged with the site. Then to the right, you see the snapshot just like
we saw on the homepage for the national data, but it’s specific to the state. Same data
points displayed, also with the percent change for the most recent two years of data that’s
been entered in the system. So now let’s go ahead and click on, you see the tabs? These
are specific to the state pages. I’m going to start with the state data page. These are
all the same data points as you saw on the national data page. I won’t read them all
back to you. But if I scroll down, you’ll see again, same way, same type of data, same
structure whereas the most recent three years of data for each category for each — for
this state are listed here — or are shown, I should say. And also the sources listed
— that sometimes can be specific for the state as well. So now, how this differs from
the national data is we’ve also got policies and initiatives, many, many policies and initiatives
that are state split — specific that the been entered. Very, very large environmental
scan was done by Social Dynamics. And just some great information. And it’s organized
by category. So I will read those categories to you. They are on the tabs here for each
state. Legislation, executive orders, policy, partnerships, system change, grant efforts,
training capacity building, consent decrees, and waivers. Again, altogether this is a compendium
of policies and initiatives across the state that have happened. And I’ll start off on
the legislation tab. I believe Danielle — are you going to describe these initiatives and
policies?>>Yes. I am. Can everybody hear me?
>>Yes, we can.>>Perfect. As Chris mentioned, there are
multiple tabs in what we’re calling the state profile. So the tabs at the top are making
up a comprehensive profile for each individual state. So I’m going to take some time to cycle
through all the different tabs to give you an example of what a state could look like
and what kind of information may be included in each profile. Chris is already on the legislation
tab. As a part of our environmental scan, we scoured state legislative sites to find
any Employment First legislation in addition to any information related to competitive
community-based employment and living for people with disabilities. As you can see here,
in Iowa, we found the Iowa assess 505, asset development bill that makes it easier for
people with disabilities to create and maintain savings accounts. So it allows them to collect
financial assets over time. Okay? Chris, if you could go to the next tab? Which is executive
orders.>>Danielle, did you want to talk a little
bit about the specific data tags for each one and the citation?
>>Sure. I’m going to do that actually in the next tab there. I think it provides a
more robust example there. But here is — we found one Executive Order for Iowa, which
is Executive Order 27. And what is a really interesting feature for the website is that
if a date is available, for when a policy or legislative Bill was enacted, you can see
the data there. You will see that right beside the Title. So that was enacted in 2003.So
as Chris was mentioning, I’d like to describe the detailed functions on this page. And it’s
not only under this page, every policy, practice and state initiative entered into the system.
Below the summary of what ever policy or initiative is being displayed, you will find three different
categories. The first one is the systems. And these are systems that are explicitly
identified in the policy or initiative. And it’s an agency. It can be mental health, it
can be I/DD, it could be Workforce development. There are five different agencies that we
used to categorize for this particular portion here. In the systems. Below systems, you will
see topics. These are topics covered in the specific policy or initiative or partnership
or systems change effort or what have you. And these key terms can be used to filter
the information in the advanced search. As Chris said, we will explore that a little
bit later. The last feature here on the page is citations. These are links that will take
you to the material included in the summary. Chris actually, can you go ahead and click
on that citation? This is the actual Executive Order that the summary is describing on the
previous page. It’s a beautiful example of a publicly available Employment First Executive
Order. So it’s a really great demonstration of what you can find in the citation tab.
Okay? Chris, could you take us to the next tab there which is policy? So through our
environment to scan, we found in Iowa, three government agencies that had Employment First
related policies and statements. You can view the titles of the policies and their summaries
as well as relevant systems, topics and citations below. So I’m not going to go through each
of them there, but you will see the same kind of set up there. You can see the different
systems that are included. There are many systems especially in the first one there.
All right? Next up we have partnerships. The evaluation team gathered information on government
agency partnerships that were dedicated to furthering the Employment First initiatives
in their states. Partnerships noted in this tab also include those cross agency collaboration
that foster general community-based employment for people with disabilities even if they
are not specifically identified as Employment First partnerships. Iowa, we found evidence
of three partnership initiatives including Iowa State leadership Employment Network.
All right? We’ll now moved to systems change grant efforts. This profile captures information
on systems change grant efforts designed to further competitive community-based employment
for people with disabilities. So each date is really — each state is really diverse
in the different source of grants obviously and the state agency receiving the grants.
Iowa had publicly available — all the information that we collectedwas through an environmental
scan. So it was only information that we could actually find on our own. Not information
given to us by the states. But — Iowa had publicly available evidence of a number of
systems change grant efforts including the Iowa Employment First initiative which is
down at the bottom. Chris, could you go ahead and scroll all the way down for me? It looked
— no. I’m sorry there it is. Iowa Employment First initiative. Could you click on the citation
there? So Iowa has provided access to their Employment First statement of findings. This
was from 2011.And this document highlights the history, mission, and vision of Employment
First in Iowa. And it provides an overview of the initiative, goals and partnerships
formed to carry out the initiative. This is another example of what you can find in the
citation tab. And so Iowa actually had some good information actually available on Employment
First. Which was great. Okay, Chris. Could you take us to the training and capacity building
tab? Perfect. Evidence and training capacity building efforts was actually probably one
of the hardest categories to collect information on. But Iowa had reference to three different
kinds of training and/or capacity building efforts. So I’d like to draw attention to
the Iowa Employment First webinars. Does this was also a great example of what some states
are providing publicly for people to access so they can get an idea of what’s going on
in their state and Employment First. Chris, if you could go down to the bottom for me
again? Right. And click on that citation. It’s great because what they’ve done is they’ve
made available their TA webinars. These include information on Customized Employment, parental
involvement, and employment best practices for people with disabilities. All right there
for anybody to access. Which was really interesting to find. And they are even by year as well.
So that information is out there for people to access. All right. The next tab we have
is the consent decrees. Now, sometimes because the information that we’re looking for had
to be publicly available, we may not have been able to find evidence of a consent decree
or a policy or initiative. And this is the case for Iowa. We weren’t able to find one.
Maybe in the future we’ll be able to add something to this tab. The last tab that we have is
waivers. In the waiver tab, we noted HCBS waivers and programs connected to waivers.
HCBS waivers. And this includes the Iowa brain injury and Iowa intellectual disability waiver.
And in the summary, you will find that they do talk about community-based living and employment
which is why they were included in this portion of the profile. Now, Chris is going to take
us through a more detailed example of the state comparisons feature. Chris?
>>Thanks, Danielle. At any point in time when you’re on a state profile you can just
complete go over here if you want to do a full state comparison. You can just jump to
another state, whatever state you want to. And hop right to it. But speaking of state
comparisons, we’ll go to that tab. And what this allows you to do, this is pretty straightforward
and self explanatory. What this allows you to do, this function allows you to compare
up to three states by category, by year. So we’ll just jump right in and compare some
states. We looked at Iowa. So let’s use Iowa. And then let’s also choose Rhode Island, and
we’ll use Washington. There we go. And the data we’ll select is mental health outcomes.
And then let’s select 2011. So I hit by. What this is going to do is generate a side-by-side
comparison for those three states for that category for that year. So just very useful
little tool for quickly locating within a specific category for that year. To be able
to compare three states. If you wanted to from there you could just click on the state
to jump back to that full state profile. And you can very quickly and easily add just that
so if you want to for example, switch and use the same three states but switch to SSA
outcomes and let’s switch to 2010, and hit apply, that is going to very quickly generate
that three state comparison. Now, one thing I’ll them straight quickly here is the print
feature. If at any point I wanted to I could go ahead and hit print. And this will allow
me if I want to print something real quick and show somebody or run to a meeting, real
quick and easy way to print this information and have it handy. To share with someone.
So I’ll cancel out of that. So that’s the state comparison feature. Again, pretty self-explanatory
but we’d love to have folks use that and let us know what they think.
>>Let me interject, Chris, one of the things that we hope to do as we move forward is to
collect information over a period of time. We actually will have some cross-sectional
longitudinal or repeated cross-sectional design kinds of things that we can do, through the
system and kind of look at how things have changed overtime. So that’s something that
may be in our future and we’re hoping to do that.
>>Great. Thanks, Doug. So now we’ll go to the advanced search. While the state comparison
focuses on the data, the advanced search focuses on the policies, initiatives, state actions
that have been entered. Now, what you see when you first start this page and I will
highlight this right here, is that there are 926 records to start with in here. These guys
have entered a ton of information in the system and that will obviously only continue to grow.
But the power in this function is in the facets and the filtering. You can drill down in real
time very quickly and easily. And build a customized search by category. So let’s start
with the state policies and initiatives. You remember these are the tabs that were listed
across each state page. So let’s say we want to first — 926 records. We want to start
out with partnerships. We’re going to now that down and that’s going too narrow in real
time and now it’s only displaying 175 records that were in the category of partnerships.
Now let’s say we want to look at partnerships that were — Medicaid agencies were involved
in. So that’s going to further filter down and we’re down looking at roughly 25 records.
Again, listed by state, by those actions. In alphabetical order. Now let’s drill down
just a little further and let’s pick a topic this time. So let’s pick — let’s go with
partnerships related — that were involving Medicaid agencies relating to self-employment.
And that is going to get us down to two. So we could look at either one of these very
quickly and easily. I’ll click on the Idaho one. This gives you again the details as you
saw Danielle show earlier. This gives you the details of that specifically related to
this state action. So now I’m going to go back and I’m going to hit — at any point
I can unclip one to go back to the previous. I will on clicks of employment and that gets
us back to the 25 records related to partnerships where Medicaid agencies were involved. So
I’m going to hit reset. That will take us back to the full record set. Now we will be
back to 926 records. And one more thing I will show you here, is we can get a little
more targeted with this search. Let’s start with a keyword. We would use the word children.
Let’s search and see what’s in there. For that. Our keyword search yielded 24 results
with children. Now, from there, we can drill down. As you can see, this gave us 24 records
but now we can use these categories to drill down within that. So let’s say within that
record set, let’s select policy. So now using the keyword children, there were three state
actions related to policy and I can click on any one of those and take a quick look
at that. Let’s look at North Carolina transition services. And I won’t read the details to
you, but very quickly and easily, you could drill down and get to the information, hopefully
that you need to get to. So I’m going to hit reset there and that will get us back to our
full record set. And the final feature that I’ll demonstrate, that’s pretty much it for
the advanced search again. Pretty self explanatory but hopefully very, very useful for everyone.
I’m going to click on the contact us button. If there’s anything — any information that’s
missing, if anything is inaccurate, please feel free to click on that, contact us form,
and let us know who you are and let us know what your question or comment is. And shoot
that to us. We love to hear from you. This will go to more than one person. So we’d love
to hear from you, and that is just about it for the overall site demonstration. But I
know that we have a number of questions that have come in. Serena, did you want to start
off with any of those questions?>>Absolutely. We’ve got a really live and
interactive audience today, which is fantastic. It shows me that people are seeing the real
potential here. So I just want to go back to a few questions. That we’ve taken during
this conversation. Because I’m sure it’s on — some of these are on other people’s minds
as well. Please continue to submit questions, and we will continue to float them. So one
question early on in the presentation was where are we getting the sources for the data?
That we’ve pulled together? There’s kind of two different trajectories that the team took.
And I believe that the folks highlighted this but I’ll just touch on them again briefly.
The first is on the actual data point, the 75 plus numbers and they to endpoints that
we’ve called, that was all came from federally reported data that one or more state systems
report in, typically on an annual basis with the exception of the Wage and Hour data which
I believe is updated quarterly. And so another question was how often will we — ODEP and
the national LEAD Center and our wonderful contact them on the phone — be updating the
data? The answer is that we will be updating each of these different sections annually
at the time that the new data is released. So in other words, if the RSA 9/11 data is
updated in let’s say February of next year, but the Wagner-Peyser data isn’t updated until
may, that’s fine. We’ll be updating RSA data first in real time and then we’ll go right
into the Wagner-Peyser data. The other place that we get the sources of information related
to the state profiles is through a very arduous, comprehensive information gathering and research
process through online web searches based on a number of terms and a very comprehensive
methodology that our e-mail using evaluation and research team designed and worked in concert
with ODEP to develop. And those private — those profiles are updated quarterly at a state
level. And so they are constantly — we know states are very active right now, that there’s
a lot going on in this field and so we want this to be as current as possible in terms
of identifying new strategies and initiatives and partnerships that states are embarking
upon. So at least for the time being, meaning for the next couple of years, the state profiles
will be updated quarterly. Another key question in line with that that came out is there were
a couple questions about, if we see something that’s missing here, or we’re updating a policy
and we want to make sure it’s added, or even if we just see something we think is inaccurate,
can we — where do we get that feedback and can we add updates? The answer is yes. We
see this as a novel way to really create an ongoing dialogue and partnership at a local
and state and federal level. And so this platform is only as successful as its usability and
accuracy. We need all of you to keep us honest and to make sure and keep us updated. I will
say that one of our limitations is that when we do our research, we really created the
parameter that all of the pieces and elements that would be created in the online state
profiles had to be accessible via another public website. And so a lot of you state
people that are on the phone today might be looking and saying, we’ve got a policy on
employment of people with disabilities. It’s not on here. My question would be, is it publicly
available? A lot of state policies, ironically, are not. Another thing that we ask you to
do is to make sure if you send something to us that you want at it, make sure it is 508-compliantand
make sure that you send the publicly available web link to it. That way, everyone has kind
of a key standard for providing information. But we anticipate getting a lot of feedback.
And what we hope this will do is encourage state governments and state cross agency partnerships
to be even more open and forthcoming and transparent about all the great work they’re doing, that
they’re going to want to use this as a way to brag and highlight some of their efforts
in this field and also to spur an ongoing national dialogue about how we can do things
better. And what’s going on and one state — going on in one state that we could do
in another state. So those are just a few of the key questions so far. I’m looking —
>>Serena, while you’re looking through, one thing I’ll just mention is that you’ll notice
we had a technical difficulty earlier. That was actually — as a result of everybody’s
hitting the site at once when we sent the link out. It’s fixed and it’s already back
upon the LEAD Center servers, but that’s a great test of what we’re doing here. So thank
you, everyone, for checking the site out.>>Absolutely. Also, I had to check with our
IT group whose. We had a great question of what’s the capacity? How many people can log
onto the site or take advantage of this platform has one — at once? Our awesome national LEAD
Center team response is, in theory, it should be able to accept and handle as many users
as necessary. And so my response to that is, let’s give it a shot. Let’s really get this
out into the public domain and really share this wonderful resource and have people using
it. We’ve worked really hard on this, and we really are committed to making it even
stronger over the next year. We’ve already received some great feedback behind the scenes
from many of our subject matter experts across the country as well as some of our federal
agency partners about additional data they’d like us to incorporate into the system. And
so we anticipate this will continue to grow. And we want people to use it because we’ve
worked really hard on it.>>Serena, one question I can answer that
came through was more of a technical question. That was about the search features, sitewide
search. Just to clarify, it is, but it only searches the Employment First subsite. You
will notice it is a subdomain,employmentfirst.leadcenter.org. It does not search LEAD Center. It only searches
the Employment First site. Just a point of litigation.
>>Thanks for making that, Chris. The lead site does have its own search feature as well,
but that’s separate and distinct from this. This is like a sub platform built within the
larger LEAD Center domain. Additionally, I believe there was a question about what FY
means. Federal fiscal years. And the timing varies obviously from source to source on
when these things are reported, which I spoke to earlier. And our intention is that as soon
as a new federal report comes out, that we will be updating it. You’ll see on this, that
the census data for example is probably out of date by a year if you’re looking at this
closely. The response to that is that when we were building the site and putting the
data in this summer, a couple of key reports came out. For example, the ICI is state data
report — also known famously as the blue book, is one that we included in here. It’s
one of the few non-federal national data sources that we use. Because of — as all of you know,
the I/DD system does not have a federal reporting infrastructure. And so that came out this
summer. The newest one. The census report was updated this summer but by then we had
already computed the most recent data that we had at that time into this. So the very
next thing we’re doing as soon as this goes live, late next week, in October, our awesome
team is going to be looking at any additional reports that came out this summer and updating
the data to reflect those new things as well.>>Serena, we’ve got a great question about
asking about data export from this site. Do you want to tackle that one?
>>I would love it if you could tackle it. [Laughter]
>>Well, the site is not intended to be a data source per se. It’s intended to be a
place where everyone can go and view this great compendium of information. And these
data points. But it’s not intended to be an actual data export source. With that comes
into play are the sources. So as you may remember from the national data page under each category,
we list the source of that data. So you can go right to that source and actually get the
data itself if you want to, as it’s available. But this site in and of itself is not intended
to be that type of resource.>>I’m so glad you raised that as well. One
thing we didn’t want to do, we were very intentional in the design of this in that we didn’t want
to reinvent the wheel. We have several federal partners that have very robust, in-depth research
and reporting systems that can be researched and queried and you can do all of that exciting
longitudinal research or comparisons that you may be interested in. That really wasn’t
the purpose of this. Our purpose was really to say, hey, we need to acknowledge that there
are multiple systems in this space. And they are all reporting specific outcomes related
to disability employment that need to be cold and brought together in some form or fashion
— need to be culled. We believe this is a steppingstone in that direction in really
helping both at a national level and at a state level for us to be even more thoughtful
in our ongoing dialogue about cross systems change and what that looks like, really understanding
our respective systems, I know that came from the kind of, Medicaid Medicare arena and terminology.
So when I came into the Workforce investment arena, you know, it was like a whole new foreign
language. And instead of performance measures and activities and — really culture to get
my hands around. We’re hoping that this site helps facilitate additional conversations
about some of our mutual priorities and objectives across the system. And a better understanding
about how we can great resources and coordinate services to really effectuate the best outcomes
possible for our common customers.>>We’ve got a little clarification on one
question about exporting. They are asking about printing and exporting like a compilation
of results. And Kelly, thanks for that question. That’s something in terms of being able to
print a compilation, like for an entire state or entire search result set, that’s something
that we’re going to look at in the next phase. But great question. That was a question that’s
been raised outside of this venue as well. So great question. And as I hopefully demonstrated,
either a small or resource by resource or a list of titles as you drill down, you can
print that. You can use the print this function that’s on every page to do it. I know it’s
not quite what you’re looking for, but give us a little time and we’ll get there.
>>Yeah. As you’re playing around with this site, as you have insights and more questions,
please keep them coming. Because we see this as an evolving platform and we really do anticipate
making several enhancements over the next year. Within reason. We got a great question
about how do we determine the number of individuals with disabilities? And there was a recognition
that there are a whole lot of people with disabilities not currently being served through
HCBS waivers, or receiving SSI or the SSDI, and you’re right. So the way we’ve looked
at the number of people with disabilities is by taking that information from U.S. Census
report. So that’s where we’ve received this information. Again there’s some questions
about how to get information on to the site. So one thing that we are contemplating and
working towards over this next year is creating a password-protected feature that would allow
state governments to actually update their own state profiles. Now, the exception would
be the data points because we pull those from federal reports and federal systems upon which
the state governments report the data. So we would not have been change those, but we
would like for them to be able to constantly update and change the state profiles. We — we
don’t have that feature in yet or that level of sophistication. So right now, you’ve got
the comment feature. If you could show them that again one more time, Chris? Their ability
to make a comment? You can go in here and do a quick comment with your name, e-mail
address and subject. And you can put your message in there, saying please add to the
following file, you know, or to the following tab, this file. And just give us the Title
that you want and make sure you give us a publicly accessible web link to that document
and make sure that document is 508-compliant. And we will get back to you in short time.
And confirm for you that that has been done.>>Serena, there was one question that came
up about distinction between the individuals with physical disabilities versus intellectual
and developmental?>>Right. I might have missed that in the
chat. So I apologize if I read over that one. Here we go. Is there a distinction — so we
have pulled data where we could, for example the VR system. Could you go to the national
data profile again for a second? Chris?>>Sure.
>>Perfect.>>No problem.
>>What we’ve been able to do, go ahead and go down to VR. That’s a great example. So
where we were able to find data that was stratified by disability status, we did try to pull those
points. And the RSA 911 data is a great example through the VR system. Because it does stratified
by number of people with communicative impairments, with visual impairments, physical disabilities,
cognitive disabilities, psychosocial disabilities, mental disabilities, et cetera. And so for
those we were able to pull some of the numbers. Additionally, with respect to the I/DD information
which is right below that, Chris, if you want to pull down maybe just a little farther,
this is specific, just to the IDP population in terms of what is reported. I should say
as a clarification here, only about 25%, roughly, of individuals with I/DD are tapped into the
systems where we would be able to capture this data. So it’s only about a fourth of
the people out there. There’s so many people out there that we’re not capturing outcome
data on. That’s a much larger national dialogue that needs to take place. But nevertheless
we are able to pull out I/DD. We also pulled out for mental health, which is — I think
is a little higher about this, we’ve got some mental health outcomes around supportive housing
and supported employment, better reported into SAMHSA, the Substance Abuse and Mental
Health Services Administration. So where we could decipher some of this data and stratified
it by disability, we did. In many of the systems, including Workforce investment for example,
a great example, they don’t stratified by subcategory of individuals with disabilities.
It’s all just disabilities. So we’re limited in terms of how far we can do that. I believe
there was a question about state footnotes. And I think this is a great question. And
something we should make sure we incorporate. Whether or not we can incorporate state footnotes
about their data or explanations of data the state may have sent in with their data to
explain potential outliers. We currently don’t have a tag just for those explanations right
now. But I don’t see any reason why we couldn’t consider how to add those footnotes into their
state data reports. And if you scroll down just a little bit, Chris, we could conceivably,
right where we do footnotes or where we put the resources underneath each of the state
data systems, we could conceivably add an additional footnote, relatively easy. Of course
I say that but I’m not the IT guru. I assume we could put in those types of points of information
and clarification relatively easily. And again, we really want to hear from states in particular
about if they see the utility in this, what’s the utility for them? And what excitement
they have about it, but also what constructive feedback or concerns they have they would
like to share?>>Serena, just got a repeat question about
is the site up where the state can look at its data? Yes.Employmentfirst.leadcenter.org.
The site is actually live now as we speak. We’re making it available to a limited audience
for testing purposes until the Pope on launching a week.That’semploymentfirst.leadcenter.org.
— until the full on launch later this week.>>I will put that here as well so folks see
that. And can access that. On their own time. I also see some additional clarification on
the suggestion on the longitudinal and — that is just a limitation of this. We only go back
to the three most recent years. Of the data. And we do that because primarily from a policy
maker point of view, they want to see some trend analysis from the most recent three
years or period of time. And we do not at this time anticipate expanding that. At this
point. But that doesn’t mean we can’t consider it in the future. At this point we really
want to — to keep this user-friendly and really entice people who do want to go a little
deeper from an academic or research or to inform public policy standpoint to really
do a deeper dive in some of the federal reporting systems that we have extrapolated this information.
And we hope that you will use this in your policy efforts to inform your policy makers
at a state level. If you are a state policy maker, to inform your work directly. And really
in some ways maybe to change up the dialogue a little bit in your state about what seems
to be working or working well. And maybe some areas that there’s room for additional discussion
and ideas. I think we’ve answered all of the questions so far. I don’t know if there’s
any interest from folks in us doing may be — I’d kind of like to do — I’m sorry — I
guess we’re wrapping it up? I’m looking –>>I’m sorry. I just told — I pulled the
screen sharing off. I just went back to the slide.
>>I thought it would be — it would be nice to maybe to a couple other search runs since
we have time and we haven’t gotten any other questions right yet. Maybe it would be good
just to look at the search piece related to some of the search terms that we use. So can
you go back to the website?>>Give me a second.
>>No problem. No problem.>>Someone says they received an error message
on when they tried to go directly to the site themselves.
>>It may have gone back down again. So we apologize for that but we will work with the
LEAD Center to make sure that that load-balancing can handle everyone’s browsing the site.
>>A comment has been made about the blue book or the state data report. And that when
we — if you can go to the national data for just a second — I think this is a really
good point. We should make this clear — and fix this — go on down to the I/DD again.
The point was made that the dollar amount — here we go — perfect — that the dollars
spent, that these are — therefore it says — missing reference to those numbers being
reported in thousands. But these are — the dollar amounts that were reported in the report
is actually thousands. And so we need to reflect that. So we’ll definitely double check that
and make sure that — I mean, obviously, we’re spending more than$695,000 a year [Laughter]
in employment services under I/DD. So that is a really good catch. And we’ll definitely
be making that immediately. So I just wanted to do maybe a couple other search runs real
quick and as we get other questions — thanks to Duane Shimante. If you think we need to
do something better, please let us know. So if you could just scroll down to the topics
a little bit, Chris, as you’ll see, we spent a lot of time thinking about what are some
of the key topics that these would be particularly interested in, in making sure there was information
on? So 14 C in the — income security, we’ve got a tag for asset development, financial
capability. Our cross agency collaboration partnership, Customized Employment, data sharing,
employer engagement, Home and Community-Based Services, mental health, provider transformation,
resource leveraging, school to work transition, segregated day and employment services and
self employment. Those are our key topics. Obviously you can also put keywords in the
search too. But I wanted to bring this to people’s attention because we felt those were
really great tags to label each of these policies and documents that are inside the state profiles
as a way to help those folks that did want to pull and see what other things are out
there around cross agency collaboration for example. So actually if we go to provider
transformation, could you click on that for a moment? This pull together all of the policies
and initiatives we have today to around that particular topic. And again as we’ve shown
in the earlier iterations, you can bring that down even further by system. So if we wanted
to go to maybe Department of mental health, we could do that and bring it down even further.
And so on and so forth. So I just wanted to bring it up again to really encourage people
to play with that for a while. It’s a great way to do a really quick search of the various
resources that are available across the state profile so that you don’t get may be overwhelmed
if you’re coming in and you want to know what’s going in, all the states in a specific area.
This is a really valuable way to get a pretty strong representative list of that information.
I don’t know if you all want to add anything on that. I think you did a great job earlier,
but to me, it’s one of the most exciting features about this platform.
>>I think just a reminder that they can use the keyword search first if they want. If
they don’t want to search by the facets that are already there, the categories and terms
that are there, they can use their own keyword search and then drill down which we displayed
— no need to show it again but just a reminder.>>There’s a lot of ways to play with this
and use it for your efforts. Again, it is a work in progress. And we really want to
qualify that where we’re very excited about the release of this, mainly for two reasons
because A, we believe it will bridge stronger conversations across stakeholders, and hopefully
encourage state governments and their respective stakeholder constituencies to share more information
about what they’re doing with the rest of the world. But second, we’re excited to launch
it finally because we’ve been working for a long time and sometimes when you get really
close to a big project like this, you miss things just like the point that Duane made
a couple months ago. So we’re excited to get more eyes on this nationally. I’m a little
nervous and overwhelmed by the idea that we make it numerous feedback, but we’re excited
about it and we do want and benefit greatly from the feedback that people can provide
to this. So we hope that you will use this as a collective resource and think of it like
that. And think about collectively contributing back to us feedback so that we can make it
better. On that note, we may be able to end early. I don’t want — I certainly don’t want
to minimize the time, but I would like to give our LEAD Center folks an opportunity
as well, and also our team an opportunity to talk about where you can send information
related to the website. So I’ll turn it back over to you all.
>>I’ll just mention here that in addition to the contact form that’s on the site, if
you have any questions or comments at all about the site, you can send those comments
[email protected] That’s [email protected] you can just use the contact form on the site.
It goes to the same place essentially. And Doug Klayman and Daniel Herbert’s contact
information are listed here as well. I think we’re going to turn that over to Rebecca.
Did you want to pick up from here?>>Before that, I’m sorry, if I could mention
one other thing on a question that came through? I think it’s an important one. You may go
into a state profile and see that for some of your data point score for a specific year
in an area, it says not applicable. And be wondering why that’s the case for your state.
There could be a number of reasons. We are considering kind of a new coding on those.
To denote either A, was the data point captured in a prior year? Sometimes you have new data
point and we will see this a lot in the Workforce investment arena with WIOA implementation
that the RSA data and Wagner-Peyser and Workforce investment system data may look really different
in a year or two from now compared to where they are today. And so the data points reflected
may have that. So there’s that as an issue. Sometimes the state for whatever reason may
not have reported that data for a specific year. And then there’s the other issue of
the fact that sometimes, the reporting that comes out is not completely comprehensive
of everything that all the states have reported. And so again, this is a limitation that we
have based upon the federal resources we’re using. And we are thinking about a better
way to denote what is going on with each of those areas. So that when you see a data element
that’s not showing up for your specific state on a certain year, that you’ll have a better
reference point or explanation as to why.>>So I’m sorry. I just wanted to share that
final thoughts with the last question that came in. Chris, I’ll turn it back over to
you all and Rebecca.>>It’s Rebecca. Thank you, Serena and thank
you to Social Dynamics and Altarum. This was a wonderful presentation and overview of the
site that’s an enormous contribution to the field. We’re very excited about it being part
of LEAD Center’s work and really look forward to hearing from people as they use the site
about ways that they’ve used it and suggestions for improvement as we go forward. We did include
contact information for LEAD Center as well, so you have the information from Social Dynamics
and Altarum and how to provide comments for the site. These are the different ways that
you can connect to the LEAD Center and the LEAD Center staff. And we thank you all for
participating. I don’t know if Chris Button might be interested in saying any final words
following this wonderful presentation? Chris?>>Sure, Rebecca. Thank you very much to our
presenters. This was just absolutely amazing. I’ve got a couple e-mails already here at
ODEP of people very excited to dig in and start using this amazing portal. Thanks to
our colleagues at Social Dynamics. And Altarum and LEAD for making this available. We’re
so excited that through this web portal, people across the country will really be able to
monitor what is going on in states. They’ll be able to measure changes in the states,
changes in numbers, changes in policies that are being passed and implemented. So it’s
just cut — got such a amazing potential. Thanks of course to Serena for her leadership
and helping turn ODEP’s Employment First evaluation data — because this information began being
collected through our evaluation, and it just became so rich. We thought, this just really
should be made available to the country. So kudos to the whole team. It’s just very exciting.
Thanks, Rebecca.>>Thank you. For people on the call, if you
have colleagues who couldn’t participate today, this will be archived next week on the LEAD
Center website at LEADcenter.org. And a transcript of the discussion will be made available,
so if you’d like to share that with any colleagues who weren’t able to participate, just visit
the LEAD Center sites next week and you’ll be able to link them to it. Thank you all
for participating. And thanks again to ODEP for all their support of this wonderful work.
Thank you.

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