Job Search Strategies: 3 Most Effective Job Search Strategies That 2X Your Interviews!

Job Search Strategies: 3 Most Effective Job Search Strategies That 2X Your Interviews!


Hi guys, it’s Caroline from newhorizoncoaching.com.au,
career coach and job search strategist. Basically, I help anyone who needs help with
their resume, needs interview training or need to master negotiation techniques, anything
from net building, network strategies, to full on job search strategies. Today, somebody asked me a very, very clever
question. They said, “If you were to lose your job today,
what would you do from a job strategy point of view? You have to imagine that you don’t have that
many connexions and that you actually are looking straight away for opportunity, what
would you do?” It got me thinking. I said, “Okay, there are a couple of strategies,”
and I talked that through with this person. Then afterwards, I was thinking, “Okay, I
better write these down, make a little brief video for you guys, so you guys can actually
see what I would do,” because basically, those strategies are some of my most effective job
search strategies too. I know, I can guarantee you, they will double
if not triple your interviews if done well. It’s pretty exciting stuff, right? All right. It’s quite warm here in Sydney, so I have
the window open. I hope there is not too much background noise. All right, so first of all, it’s leveraging
your LinkedIn connexions. Even if you don’t have an active presence
on LinkedIn and you want to use LinkedIn to find a job, there are very clever ways you
can do and use your LinkedIn network. For example, so first thing I would do is
join relevant groups. I don’t mean groups that you can say other
job seekers are hanging out. No, I mean, groups that where you know that
your hiring manager hangs out. For example, if I’m a marketing manager, I
might join the group for CMOs, so chief marketing officers, for those who are not in marketing. Those are the groups that I would join. When you join a group, that actually means
that you have access to that network of connexions. Basically, you don’t have to have a broad
network to be able to tap into a really extensive network then. That’s the first thing. The second thing I would to is actually look
at the companies that I think I would be perfectly suited to. I’m going to give you an example. Say, I used to work for PepsiCo and I want
to work for Coca-Cola. Now, instead of really looking at my connexions
in my immediate circle and my immediate network, I’m going to look outside who is connected
with them that works at Coca-Cola, which actually broadens again the circle. Then I will actually say, “Okay, I have to
do a little bit of research at this stage,” so the first thing you’re going to do is you’re
going to use LinkedIn, the advanced search, to look up a contact’s name, and you’re going
to say, “Okay, if I work in Coca-Cola as a recruiter, who would I report into?” Oh, the HR manager. Okay, who is the HR at Coca-Cola? You type that in into LinkedIn, you come up
with a name, and there, bang, you have it. The next step that you’re going to do is you’re
going to have the person that you’re connected to if they know that person personally. They might say yes or no. It doesn’t really matter, but it gives you
ammunition to actually reach out to that person, to the HR director and say, “Hey, I’m actually
exploring the market, the job market at the moment, and my contact or my colleague or
my ex-colleague, or my friend is working for you guys and speaks very highly of your company
culture. I wanted to actually explore if there would
be any opportunities now or in the future for me to work with your company.” Now, what you’re doing by doing this is first
you refer somebody that works in the same organisation, so it’s a referral, whether
that person, they know each other or not, it doesn’t matter. It really lifts up the way that people are
going to … Responds to your answer. If I don’t know you and you text me out of
the blue or send me an email out of the blue, then I’m going to look at your email very
differently than if you’ve mentioned, “Oh, I know Sarah that works at your organisation. She speaks very highly of the company culture,
and blah, blah,” I’m going to look very differently at it because they’re two different ways of
approach. That’s how I would leverage LinkedIn and the
connexions, and specifically the second degree connexions. It’s not always a matter of speech of who
you are immediately connected with. It’s also who you’re connected with in a second
degree, if you know what I mean? All right, so the second strategy that I would
really get together is my story. Like most people that are job searching, they
just list things that they can do and they just say, “I have this many years experience. I can do this. I can do that. I’ve had these responsibilities. I’ve worked with the director,” but they don’t
really package their story. They don’t, in marketing you call it an elevator
speech, one of those speeches that in 90 seconds you can tell who you are, what your added
value is, who you worked with, why companies should hire you. It’s not something you can wing and just say,
“Hey, I am a Caroline. I’m a career coach.” No, it’s something you really need to craft
and really think about, how am I going to put together my story? What is my added value? The key to this is, because this is an awesome
piece of content you’re creating, you put that piece of content on your resume, you
put it on your LinkedIn profile, and it is the answer to the question like, “Tell me
about yourself,” in an interview. You use that in three places, and it’s that
consistency that really sets you apart from your competition. It’s really important to get your story right
and to get your elevator pitch. It’s not about you. It’s about what problem you can solve with
your skills and what your talents is, what your strengths are, and how you can package
that up into your personal brand. As you can tell, probably, I’m very, very
passionate about that, because if you get that right, that’s the foundation. Everything falls into place. That’s the second strategy that I would do,
is get my story right. If I get my story right, then I can use it
on my resume. Then I can use it on my LinkedIn, and I can
use it in a cover letter. I can use it in interviews, and all my resume
material or my marketing material, when I say my marketing material, it’s your resume,
your cover letter, your LinkedIn profile, anything how you brand yourself and go out
to the world, that is your marketing material because you’re selling brand you. Basically, that will set you apart is your
collateral basically, and it has to have a very powerful message, because I know when
I send it out that I will get callbacks because my story matches up to what problem I can
solve, the added value I can add to an organisation. When people check out my LinkedIn page, my
LinkedIn profile, they see it’s consistent. When people invite me for an interview, again,
they have that consistency, that consistent feel of what I’m actually telling them. Basically that’s my second strategy is get
my story right and making sure that when it’s read by the hiring manager or by an HR, it
resonates and they are so excited then to actually pull me in for an interview. The third strategy is to be proactive. Everybody is saying, “Oh, you have to be proactive
in your job strategy,” but what does that actually mean, being proactive. It’s so easy to say, “Oh, you have to be,”
but what do you have to do? I thought to actually talk you through the
process. You have two ways of being proactive. One way is basically you have your target
companies. The easiest and simplest way to get your list
of target companies together is you look at the companies that you have worked at, and
you literally look at the competitors, look at the suppliers, look at the partners, and
so on. These companies, that list that you’re making
is going to love your skillset and your knowledge. They’re going to think you’re the next best
thing that happened to them because the added value is massive. That’s a list that I would first make. Then you actually use LinkedIn to gather information. You put into an advanced search, again, the
name of the company, the person that you probably would report into, not their name, their job
title. You put current. You put your country in and you press search,
and you see who comes up. Now, when you have a name, you actually reach
out to them. You can do this via LinkedIn, sending an email,
or you can do that directly to send them a personal email and say to them, “Hey, I’ve
actually have skillset that are very similar and I’m currently exploring the market, and
I wanted to have a confidential chat with yourself to see if you have any opportunities
now or maybe in the future, looking forward to your thoughts.” This is really a proactive way and you don’t
have to expect a job out of it straightaway, because that is most of the time what blocks
people. They have this expectation that if they do
it once, then they should have a reply or they should have a job out of it. That’s not the reality of it. The reality is that you have to be persistent,
that you have to do this over and over, and that you have to establish a network. People who don’t have a network, that is the
way you actually start to connect with people. You have to start somewhere. Everybody did. It might be pushing yourself a little bit
outside your comfort zone, but believe me, it’s worth it if done right. Okay, so next to that, you also have another
approach, and that approach, if you, for example, see a company, going to take Coca-Cola again,
if you see Coca-Cola advertising, and I’m from PepsiCo, but I now, like, “Oh my god,
I would be brilliant for this opportunity,” and the ad says, “Look, join the Coca-Cola
team. We’re very innovative and ambitious. This role will be reporting directly into
the HR director, blah, blah, blah,” what I would do them is actually plug that into LinkedIn
again. LinkedIn is my best friend. Plug that into LinkedIn again and actually
see, you put Coca-Cola, you put HR director, and you put the country in, and you see who
comes up. You have a name, and then you, again, reach
out to that person and say, “Look, I’ve been made aware that you’re advertising for a recruiter,
I’m quite interested in this position. I’ve been actually recommended also by my
contact, Anna or Sarah, whatever you want to say, Sarah who work for your organisation. I was hoping to have a confidential conversation
with you before applying so I can find out a little bit more about the position and about
my suitability and understand what you’re looking for.” When you do that, you have multiple elements
going in your job search. You’re not only relying on hit apply and just
cross fingers or fingers crossed, I always get that wrong, that things will work out
and that the person will call you back. You’re being more proactive and taking control
of your own job search and making a big difference. That’s what needs to happen. I believe not in all cases but in most cases,
the job market is not more difficult. The job market is different. You need to have a different approach to actually
be successful. You have to really look at the ways you look
at jobs and embrace really that you might have to position yourself different, do your
personal branding different. Even if it feels yucky and uncomfortable to
talk about yourself, because you think like, “Oh, I’m blowing my own trumpet here,” it’s
thing that, okay, you have to get comfortable with. There are degrees. You have people that go far and are very comfortable
talking about themselves and exaggerate it even, or you have people that actually just
can articulate clearly what they do and the value they can bring to an organisation. That is basically what most people need to
do, is really being able to articulate what they can bring to the table and the value
they can add. My three most efficient and effective job
search strategies are, to summarise, first, leverage LinkedIn connexions and the power
of your second degree connexions, so not only your immediate circle but also the broader
circle. Two, is getting your story right, your elevator
pitch that you’ll use on your resume, your LinkedIn profile that you will use when people
ask you in an interview like tell me about yourself, that you will use networking events
to being able to convey what you do very clearly that that person immediately understands when
they can refer you, so your unique value proposition. Third strategy would be to be more proactive,
whether it’s through putting together a list of targeted companies, or if it’s being proactive
with jobs that are actually are advertised and approaching the hiring manager before
you apply online to have a confidential conversation with them, that’s it. That’s what I would do, and I know it works
because I’ve done it before. This is it. I hope that this helped. If you have any questions at all, let me know. Send me an email on [email protected],
ask me the question that you have. I’m more than happy to make a video like this
and actually come back to you, or you can actually just write below this video. Don’t forget to share this video. It’s really good to reach other people that
might be struggling also, because I love advising people on their job search, resume, strategies,
and even interview strategies. Let me know what you need, and I will give
it to you. All right, thank you very much. Bye-bye.

2 thoughts on “Job Search Strategies: 3 Most Effective Job Search Strategies That 2X Your Interviews!

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Copyright © 2019 Toneatronic. All rights reserved.