How To Get A Job In Finland – 10 Tips to Increase Your Chances


– Finding a job here in Finland
can be quite a challenge. But for today, I’ve prepared you 10 tips that can improve your chances of landing a job here in Finland. Let’s go check them right now. What up Finntastics, how’re you doing? If you’re here for the first time, my name is Alex and I
create Finntastic videos about Finnish culture,
lifestyle and language. So if you’re even slightly
into that kind of stuff hit that subscribe button
because you will join our Finntastic squad, and you’ll get more awesome Finnish videos in the future. Number one, networking. Did you know that most positions get actually filled before
they get even posted publicly? That’s right, and that is the reason why it’s very, very important to start networking in Finland. Things like word of mouth, networks, acquaintances are very valuable. And what you can do, is
start talking to them. Actually, start talking to Finnish people. (ding) Your neighbors, your friends,
your local business owners, going to events and
networking there, very useful. Very, very useful, because you know, Finland is a very small country. And practically, everybody
knows everyone here. Well not quite, but still, we have only 5.5 million people so getting those business contacts and networks is very important. And you can, for example,
(ding) look up business events here in Finland, for example on Facebook
and Meetup.com, go do that. Number two, get really
skilled at your craft. Let’s think about this from
the employer’s perspective. They have a job opening, there’s
numbers of people applying, but why should they pick
you, among the other applicants, with among also Finnish people who might be applying for the same job. So you need to get really good
at whatever your skills are. Luckily there are a number
of careers and positions and jobs where you can improve your skills on your own.
(ding) This could be like software
engineering or graphic designer or maybe even a photographer
or videographer. So you have to get really skilled. And you have to also show the employer, employer, you have to show the employer that you actually have
these concrete skills that can benefit the company,
that’s all about that, getting and landing those jobs. This kind of approach
doesn’t apply to all jobs but keep this in mind when you’re applying to those jobs, why they should pick you. Why should I pick you? Number three, LinkedIn. LinkedIn is this like
professional social media platform where people usually
get in touch and share professional-related content. LinkedIn is very, very
much used in Finland. So if you don’t have a LinkedIn profile I strongly advise you to create one. LinkedIn is not only
(ding) good for networking, but there, you can also find job
listings on LinkedIn. And you can for example,
search “jobs in Helsinki” and as you can see,
quite many of these jobs are job applications,
are posted in English, which means that, usually, the job is carried out in English as well. You can find a lot of videos on tutorials how to improve your LinkedIn profile if you need to update it
and improve it a little bit. So, just go on Youtube and
find like LinkedIn tutorials, You should be good to go with those. By the way, if you find these tips useful, don’t forget to hit that like button. Number four, get a degree here. Okay, and this is maybe
not optional for everyone, but if you have a chance to
study a degree in Finland, and you’re determined that
you want to come to Finland, live here maybe for the
rest of your life and stuff, consider doing a degree here. There are lots of universities
of applied sciences and universities which offer degrees completely in English.
(ding) And not only have chance
to get their degree but also get understanding
of the Finnish people, culture, language, working culture. And these all important
if you want to plan a life or getting a job here in Finland. And I used to be a tutor for international engineering students at Tampere University of Technology, and most of them have
actually got a job here either in Tampere or Helsinki area, so it’s definitely possible,
but I also have to mention that if you are coming from an engineering field or ICT field, you have very, very good chances to find a job here
(ding) for that kind of people because the ICT field keeps getting bigger and people want coders and
developers, so if you have a skill or background in that kind of stuff, you have a good chance. And also, if you do a degree here, there’s also a special residence permit for job applications, so if you get a job here,
(ding) you can get a one-year extension for your residence permit for job hunting. That’s also good to keep in mind in terms of staying and living in Finland. Finnish universities have no tuition fees for European and EEA people. But if you come outside of Europe, many of the schools offer also tuition waivers and scholarships. And what I’ve heard,
it’s actually quite easy to get one of those, for example, here at Tampere University of Technology. But I strongly recommend
(ding) you go check those out and see whether that might be
possible for you as well. If you can’t afford to
get the degree here, consider just doing an exchange period. I mean, the Finnish universities have a lot of partner universities, and they might be also
part of your university, so doing one or two semesters here can also improve your chances. Number five, startups. The startup culture and startup business is still booming here in Finland. There’s new startups coming
left and right and center, and usually the startups aim
for international success, which means usually that they want to hire also internationals. And many of the startups
also operate in English. That’s natural
(ding) because if they want to, for example, appeal to international investors, they have to do stuff in English. I’ll link you one link
here, they have the FI, and they usually post Finnish
jobs related to startups and they’re pretty much all in English, so you wanna check them out if there’s anything that could interest you. Number six, learn Finnish. I mean this is probably the
most, the biggest obstacle that people have when it
comes down to finding a job. Because most of the jobs
here require Finnish, and Finnish is not an
easy language to learn. So it’s definitely a challenge. There’s like a handful of jobs which are done in English.
(ding) And those were the ones
which I just mentioned which I mentioned earlier, software engineers, graphic
designers and stuff. But unfortunately, big number
of jobs are in Finnish. What I’ve noticed and what I’ve observed is that very low-skilled
jobs like cleaners, newspaper distributors and stuff, and very high-skilled
jobs, software engineers, project managers, and stuff,
(ding) these ones can be actually
done without any Finnish. But if you want to aim to the middle, then it usually needs,
or requires Finnish. And, I mean, I’m not sure
if this is completely true, but this is what I’ve noticed, I’ve heard other people saying the same, and that’s how it is, do you
agree or disagree with me? Let me know in the comments below. Don’t give up just yet
because there are many people before you who
have learned the Finnish, and who are working in Finnish, and I know, for example, Raul, from Mexico who’s also been on this channel (ding)
(Raul speaking in Finnish) I know that he has a job
where he’s working in Finnish, and his Finnish is pretty much fluent. So, people before you have done it. So, it means that you can also do it. And for example, you can take
my free spoken Finnish course, I’ll put the link in the
description and in the cards. You can check it out after this video. Number seven, study the labor market. This is more like an advanced tip, but it might help you if
you figure out and study which professions and which
fields are looking for workers and which fields are more saturated. And for example, what you can use, is there’s a tool called Ammattibarometri, it’s like a profession barometer
or something like this, occupational barometer, yeah, that’s the thing.
(ding) Barometer is the view of the TE offices about the developments prospects in the key occupations in the near future. They have just uploaded and republished the newest information,
and this barometer’s also in English, so you
can check it out yourself, and for example, if I
open the whole Finland, we can see that the most
top 15 demand jobs there for example, audiologist
and speech therapists construction supervisors, civil engineers, nursing associate professionals, dentists, welder and
flame cutters, and so on so this might help you or give
you an overall impression, what kind of jobs are
in demand in Finland. And you can, for example
also look regionally. Like if we take Helsinki or Uusimaa, and if we look at the top 15 demand, we have early childhood educators, audiologists, civil
engineers, house builders, construction supervisors,
kind of the same stuff here, and we can also see the bottom demand or like, which are like saturated. There’s printers, pre-press technicians, bank tellers, journalists,
these kind of things. So you can go check out
this barometer yourself and see, kind of study it yourself and see what kind of stuff is in demand and which is saturated. Number eight, contact
the business directly. Like I said in the beginning,
most of the jobs get filled before even posted publicly. So what you can do is just call or reach out to companies
yourself, directly. Introduce yourself and ask if
there’s any opening positions, because I know Finnish people, both Finns and Internationals,
have done this and got jobs. And, I mean, that means you can also success with this trick as well. And even if they don’t have any possible opportunities at the time (ding)
when you’re calling there, you can just tell them, okay, take my contact information down or maybe ask the LinkedIn connection, and maybe there will be
opportunity later on in the future. Number nine, consider starting
your own business in Finland. Competing in the Finnish labor market can be a quite challenge, but
if you have some good skills, which you could monetize and make money, consider starting your own business. And actually, it’s quite interesting, if you wanna start a
business here in Finland, it doesn’t depend on your citizenship but your permanent residence country. And anyone who has a permanent residence in EEA Country, which is
European Economic Area, if I’m not completely mistaken, can start a business in Finland. But of course, still if you
want to live in Finland, you might need a residence
permit visa, whatever so it still doesn’t quite
really solve the problem, but all you need
basically, to technically, to start a business, and of course, like doing business is not so easy. You need like business plan and funding, and you know, a working idea
that could make you some money. But for example, I started a business for this Youtube channel in the summer, and this is actually a
quite easy way to start (ding)
because I have no costs. I mean if sometimes I buy
some new equipment and stuff, but I mean, Youtube is free and uploading, creating videos
is free, there’s no costs. You maybe wanna check out
some digital opportunities. Like, this kind of digital
entrepreneur opportunities if you wanna go that way. Number 10, and this is the last tip, Consider doing internship
or voluntary work. I’m in part of many, these
international Facebook groups, and every once in a while,
I see that there’s someone going to come to Finland
and do like an internship, so you can do the same, depending
on your field, but still. If you wanna check out
some possible internships, (ding)
there’s, for example, again on LinkedIn, and there’s
also a place called TheHub, that was the startup thing,
and also Glassdoor.com. And this place, you can actually filter English-speaking positions
and also on their level. Like you can put like internship level, entry level, and so on, so you might find something interesting there for you. And bonus tip for you, at
the end, don’t give up. I mean Finland is a
really challenging place and country to find a
job and start a career, but there are people who
have done that before you. So, it’s definitely not impossible to do, but still, quite a
challenge, but don’t give up. Just keep pushing, keep networking, keep looking for
opportunities, and who knows, maybe your next job opportunity in Finland might be just around the next corner. And check out this
video where I share tips about Finnish work and business culture. You might find also useful. See you in the next video, so much.

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