6 museum treasures in Vienna more than worth a visit – VIENNA/NOW Top Picks


Most people know that Vienna is
home to a lot of different museums. But what people may not think about,
are the really special artifacts that are actually housed
in these museums. Right now, I’m standing in front of the
only still existing feather headdress from the Mesoamerican time,
which is currently housed in the recently reopened Weltmuseum. And with that, here’s our top picks
of singular museum treasures that call Vienna their home. This 16th century Aztec
headdress from Mexico is the only one of its
kind still preserved and has become an iconic artifact
of the Weltmuseum Wien. Tradition holds that the Penacho
de Moctezuma belonged to the Aztec emperor
Moctezuma the second. However, its provenance is uncertain. The Albertina houses the largest and most valuable collections
of graphics in the world, including Albrecht Dürer’s
masterpiece “The Young Hare”. To protect this extraordinary
watercolor painting, a facsimile is shown
at the permanent exhibition. The original can only be
shown twice every five years. Egon Schiele’s “Self-Portrait with Physalis”
is captivating, showing self-confidence
and fragility at once. He painted it in his most productive
year, in 1912, at only 22 years of age. It is on display at
the Leopold Museum, which houses the largest
Schiele collection in the world. This Renaissance
masterpiece is on display at the Art History Museum,
the Kunsthistorisches Museum. Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s monumental
composition “The Tower of Babel” became the most famous classic among all the depictions of
this well-known bible story. Some of the inspiration for
the extraordinary architecture came from the Colosseum in Rome,
which the Dutch painter visited in 1553. It is the undisputed highlight
of the Belvedere museum: Gustav Klimt’s world-famous
masterpiece “The Kiss”, which marks the high point
of Klimt’s golden period. The painting is composed
of conventional oil paint with applied layers of gold leaf and is widely considered a masterpiece
of the early modern period. The creation of the
Venus von Willendorf dates back 29500 years
and bears witness to the beginnings of our culture. It was found in the Wachau
in Lower Austria in 1908 and is only 11 centimeters tall. It is the showpiece of the collection of the Natural History Museum,
the Naturhistorisches Museum.

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